August 28, 2020

Penn. court tosses moral-character rule for estheticians

GL Solutions regulatory news

Penn. court tosses moral-character rule for estheticians

A Pennsylvania court ruled Tuesday that a law requiring estheticians to be of “good moral character” in order to become licensed is unconstitutional, according to Pennlive.com. The state Board of Cosmetology had refused to license a pair of applicants with criminal records. The court deemed the requirement unconstitutionally discriminatory, however, as it does not apply to others in the industry, including barbers. The case can be appealed to the state Supreme Court.

Calif. nursing home inspectors object to new consultative approach

A new California mandate asks nursing home inspectors not only to enforce rules, but also to provide advice, according to the Sacramento Bee. Nursing home inspectors say this is a conflict of interest, pointing to a federal law, the 1987 Nursing Home Reform Act,  they say prohibits them from serving in a consulting role. In addition, some inspectors say they are alarmed by a potential shift from regulating to counseling a mainly for-profit industry.

Ohio creates temporary school-age child care license

Child care providers licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) and the Ohio Department of Education may now care for school-age children who must learn remotely during the school day. In addition, the ODJFS created a new license—the temporary pandemic school-age child care license. The ODJFS allows churches, businesses and other organizations to apply for the license to provide care to children during the day, according to WSAZ.

Hawaii officials asked for COVID tracing information

Members of a COVID committee want the Hawaii Department of Health to share more information with the public. The committee, according to Governing, says the public needs information about infected people, such as where the transmission occurred and whether they may have infected others. The committee pointed to Springfield, Mo.,  as a model for sharing COVID health information.

Mo. relaxes licensing rules for substitute teachers

The Missouri State Board of Education passed an emergency rule to make obtaining a substitute teaching license easier. The decision, effective for 180 days, allows anyone with a high school diploma to take a 20-hour online test to get licensed, according to St. Louis Public Radio. The board said schools need additional substitute teachers because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Texas releases COVID data related to child care centers

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission has published COVID case information showing cases in 1,867 child care facilities, summer camps and before and after school programs. The state agency does not keep data on the number of children or staff at child care facilities, making assessing the spread of the virus at these facilities a challenge. Parents pressed the state for the COVID data to help judge the safety of their current and prospective providers, according to the Texas Tribune.

Mass. officials shut down bars that masquerade as restaurants

Lawrence’s licensing board has started shutting down bars that masquerade as restaurants. According to state law, bars must serve food prepared on the premises. Several bars followed earlier guidelines to serve food and purchased food from caterers. Bar owners argue that the board shut them down without a hearing, according to the Eagle-Tribune.

 

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