September 28, 2022

N.H. Board of Medicine Investigated by Legislators

Regulatory Roundup

N.H. Board of Medicine Investigated by Legislators

Legislators plan to investigate how the New Hampshire Board of Medicine compares to other states for “transparency regarding doctor misbehavior in what a committee chairman said would be a ‘deep dive,’” according to Yahoo! News. The investigation follows a Boston Globe article on Yvon Baribeau, a now-retired heart surgeon with cases connected to at least 20 malpractice settlements in New Hampshire. Mark Pearson, chairman of the committee leading the investigation, stated: “There were no references on the New Hampshire Board of Medicine to this particular individual, but there was extensive reference on the Massachusetts board, and yet we are talking about events that are allegedly taking place in New Hampshire. Why would Massachusetts have more information than our own state is the trigger here.”

Calif. Medical Board Adopts New Methods to Adjust to Remote Work

The Journal of Medical Regulation explains how the Medical Board of California adapted to COVID to support remote work. The state harnessed two methods to shift from a paper-based system to a digital system; these methods included online verification of Continuing Medical Education (CME). According to the Journal on July 22, “Previously, CME auditing was a completely manual process for MBC, as California licensees kept record of and tracked their own verification to provide MBC either by mail or email within 60 days of a required audit.”

Ala. Social Work Grads. Struggle with Licensing Exam, Bias, Association Says

According to data from the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), cited on September 23 in the Alabama Daily News, “46% of Alabama graduates with bachelor’s degrees taking the licensure exam for the first time in 2021 passed. That compares to a U.S. and Canadian pass rate of 68.7%.” In addition, the association’s analysis of 2018-2021 passing rates for the bachelor’s exam showed 82% of white test takers passed, compared to 38% of Black test takers. Leaders of the ASWB leaders said the analysis offers “an important starting point in a collective process to better help all test-takers be equally prepared for success on the examinations.” The Alabama State Board of Social Worker Examiners responded to the findings, noting: Alabamians taking the clinical licensure exam — the third and highest licensure offered — in Alabama did pass at a higher rate than the rest of the U.S. and Canada.

 

Stay up to date

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive the latest regulatory news delivered to your inbox each week.

GL Solutions helps governments run, grow and adapt. To learn more, explore our website, call us at (971) 337-2659 or email us at hello@glsolutions.com.

Related content